AUTODESK QUANTITY TAKEOFF 2013 TUTORIAL PDF

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Welcome to Autodesk Quantity Takeoff (QTO). Using QTO, you can produce detailed quantity takeoff for material, labor, and other resources to accurately. Getting Started Guide. Online Resources. Autodesk Quantity Takeoff Website · Support Center · Updates & Service Packs · Autodesk Quantity Takeoff Forum. AUTODESK QUANTITY TAKEOFF USER MANUAL -- | PDF | 85 Pages | KB AUTODESK QUANTITY TAKEOFF USER.


Autodesk Quantity Takeoff 2013 Tutorial Pdf

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Quantity Take Off Manual - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. Welcome to Autodesk Quantity Takeoff (QTO). QTO. Guide Autodesk Quantity Takeoff User's Guide Welcome to Autodesk Quantity Takeoff (QTO). Using QTO, you can COM Download Manual Reference and Free Ebook PDF Autodesk Quantity. Takeoff User Guide. 6 days ago Takeoff Free Download Get Into Pc [PDF] [EPUB] Autodesk, Inc. is an American multinational Software Free Download PDF And Video.

Yields a linear measurement of one or more line or arc segments. Rectangle Linear Takeoff. Yields a linear measurement from rectangular geometry. Ellipse Linear Takeoff. Yields a linear measurement from elliptical geometry. Yields an area measurement from a closed polyline made up of line or arc segments.

Rectangle Area Takeoff. Yields an area measurement from rectangular geometry. Ellipse Area Takeoff. Yields an area measurement from elliptical geometry. Counts takeoff objects. Removes a takeoff measurement from a closed polyline area.

Rectangle Backout Takeoff. Removes takeoff measurements from rectangular geometry. Ellipse Backout Takeoff. Removes takeoff measurements from elliptical geometry. Count Backout Takeoff.

Removes count takeoff. Markup Tools Shape. Adds markup shapes to a sheet. Options include Line, Polyline, Rectangle, and Ellipse. Adds markup text to a sheet. Adds a callout to a sheet. Adds a stamp to a sheet. Canvas The canvas is the large area in the middle of the QTO window, which displays the sheet or 3D model selected on the Documents palette. On the canvas, you create takeoff from sheets and models, annotate sheets using markup tools, and validate the completed takeoff data.

When displaying a 3D model, the canvas contains an additional screen element that is not displayed with sheets: the ViewCube. Click the ViewCube to switch between standard and isometric views of your model. Use the compass ring on the ViewCube to orbit the model in any direction. Palettes The menu bar at the top of the QTO window gives you access to all available actions. Clicking a Project documents, takeoff data, and the tools you use to organize and view documents and data are arranged on palettes that display as tabs on the left side of the QTO window by default.

Put the cursor on a tab to display the palette. If a palette is not shown in the QTO window, you can access it on the Window menu. Documents Palette The Documents palette is where you store and organize all sheets, models, and images for your project. The document you select on the Documents palette displays on the canvas. Project documents are organized in a folder structure that is similar to the navigation tree in Windows Explorer.

You can add, rename, and delete folders to organize project documents. In the following illustration, the Documents palette contains the folder structure that is created when you import files for the Basic Takeoff project in this guide. In a later exercise, you reorganize the folders and documents. Takeoff indicators display on document icons to identify sheets and models that contain takeoff data.

The amount of takeoff contained in each document is displayed in the Takeoff column on the Documents palette. The values in the Takeoff column represent the sum of manual takeoff and visible automatic takeoff for each sheet and model. Automatic takeoff that is present in multiple views is counted for each document in which it is visible.

The check box in the Legend column controls the visibility of sheet legends. A legend is a reference table on a drawing sheet that lists and defines the colors used for takeoff markup on the sheet. You can add a legend to any 2D sheet in a QTO project. View Options On the Documents palette, click View Options to access the display options: Large Thumbnails: Displays a scaled-down image to the left of the sheet name.

Quantity Take Off Manual

Thumbnails can serve as a graphical index, making it easier to visually scan and recognize images. Small Thumbnails: Displays a reduced-size thumbnail image to the left of the sheet name.

List: Displays the file icon and sheet name. Tip You can also access the display options by right-clicking an empty area of the Documents palette and clicking View Options. Takeoff Palette The Takeoff palette is where you store and manage all takeoff data for a project.

The data is organized in the following hierarchy, which forms the organizational structure of your project: Groups: Like folders and subfolders, groups store takeoff data. In QTO, this highest level of organization is represented by groups. You can create multiple levels of groups and subgroups. Items: Groups contain items, which are families of objects, such as interior walls and plumbing fixtures, to be measured and counted.

Objects: Items contain objects, which are individual instances of the takeoff items in the sheets and models in your project. This hierarchy of groups, items, and objects is graphically represented in an expandable and collapsible navigation tree. In the following illustration, the Takeoff palette contains the takeoff data you create by doing the exercises in this guide. View and Edit Options The left side of the Takeoff palette contains check boxes that you use to control whether takeoff graphics are shown or hidden on the canvas and whether takeoff data can be edited.

Use the Takeoff palette context right-click menu to access another view option: The Views command locates and zooms in to a selected takeoff object. A checkmark in a box at any level of the tree indicates that takeoff graphics are visible on the canvas.

A group-level selection controls the visibility of all subgroups, items, and objects within the group. An item-level selection controls the visibility all objects within the item. Objects can be selected individually. A in a box at any level of the tree indicates that the takeoff cannot be selected on the canvas, although it may be visible.

In addition, when you lock an item, you cannot delete it or drop objects into it although you can add objects to it using takeoff tools or assignments. To locate a takeoff object on the canvas: 1. On the Takeoff palette, right-click the object, and click Views.

QTO displays a list of all project views that contain the object. Select a view drawing from the list. QTO opens the view and zooms in to the selected takeoff object.

To zoom back out to the full window view, click View Fit to Window. Properties Palette When you view a DWF sheet or model that was published from a design application, such as AutoCAD Architecture or Revit Architecture, the Properties palette displays property data for an object selected on the canvas. For example, when you select an interior wall on the canvas, the published DWF properties for the wall display on the Design tab, and the takeoff measurements display on the Takeoff tab, as shown.

Design Tab Takeoff Tab Navigator Palette When you are viewing a 2D sheet on the canvas, the blue frame on the Navigator palette outlines the area of the sheet that is currently in view. This can be helpful when you are working with a very large detailed sheet.

The blue rectangle acts as a magnifying glass on the sheet. Drag it to reposition the view location on the canvas. At the bottom of the Navigator palette is a zoom control toolbar. Use the controls to zoom in or out by small or large increments. Model Palette When you are viewing a 3D DWF file, the objects that are published from the design application display on the Model palette in a navigation tree that is similar to the tree in Windows Explorer.

You can make a selection at any level of the tree, and then right-click to access commands for filtering the display of the model on the canvas and for creating takeoff for the selected group, item, or object: Hide.

Hides the selected object s from view Hide Others. Hides all objects from view except the selected object s Show All. Restores the default view of the model, with all objects shown on the canvas Transparent. Toggles the object display between transparent and opaque Invert Selection.

Selects all objects except the object s selected on the Model palette Takeoff. Creates takeoff for a selected group, item, or object and places the results on the Takeoff palette Takeoff to Item. Adds takeoff results for selected items or objects to a specified item on the Takeoff palette View Options As you work with a 3D model, click View menu Standard Views to access a full set of model views: Contextual Tools Palette The Contextual Tools palette identifies the currently selected tool and provides access to tool options, such as line or fill color, opacity, hatch pattern, text color, and font size.

Bookmarks Palette The Bookmarks palette displays any bookmarks that were created in the drawing file by the design application from which the drawing file was published. Use bookmarks to navigate to published or user-specified locations in the sheet or model. Layers Palette Use the Layers palette to show or hide layers that were created in the design application from which the drawing file was published.

Search Palette Use the keyword search feature on the Search palette to locate all occurrences of a word or phrase in sheets, models, takeoff groups, items, and objects. Use the navigational links in the search results to navigate to an item and view its takeoff data. The Search palette works in conjunction with the Search function on the menu bar.

You can then use the Search palette to refine the results.

Use the Workbook to view detailed takeoff data for the active sheet or the entire project. The Workbook is organized by tabs that match the top-level groups for example, disciplines, divisions, or trades on the Takeoff palette. It contains one additional tab: the Summary tab, which is a compilation of all takeoff information for all categories. Note The units of measure that display in the Workbook are typically specified when you create takeoff items; however, you can modify them directly in the Workbook.

By default, the Workbook shows a summary of takeoff items with their associated quantities. To display their material, labor, and equipment costs, right-click any column header in the Workbook and select the cost columns to display. The quantity and cost data in the Workbook can help you answer questions, such as: How many doors are needed for the 3rd floor?

How much will they cost? What will it cost to install them? From the summary view, double-click an item to display the detailed object data associated with it. To return to the summary view, click the Back button in the upper-left corner of the Workbook. The Forward button , which displays next to the Back button in the summary view, provides another way to view item detail. Select an item and click to view its object data. In the summary view, the tabs are active.

Click a tab to view its contents. In the detail view, the tabs are inactive dimmed because the view is limited to the object data for the selected item. Working with Data in the Workbook The Workbook contains object data for all of the takeoff you create in a project.

When you select an item on the Takeoff palette and use a takeoff tool to count or measure a piece of geometry on a sheet, that takeoff measurement is recorded for the item in both the summary and detail views of the Workbook.

As long as the item remains selected on the Takeoff palette, subsequent takeoff measurements are added to the totals for that item in the Workbook. Navigate and edit Workbook cells using functionality like that found in Microsoft Excel.

With a cell selected: Press the TAB key to move one cell to the right. Use the arrow keys to move up, down, left, or right one cell at a time. Override item data, such as dimensions and measured quantities, by making entries in cells and pressing the ENTER key.

Use the formula bar to enter formulas for items and objects. Viewing Data for the Current Sheet or Entire Project By default, the Workbook displays takeoff data for the current sheet; however, it includes the option to view data for the entire project.

To switch between Sheet and Project views, click and select a view option. When Sheet is selected, the name of the sheet or model displays in the Workbook header. When Project is selected, the name of the project displays in the header. The filter option you specify is applied to both the summary and detail views of the Workbook, and it is saved as a display setting, so it persists from session to session.

To change the height of the rows in the Workbook, click menu decreased proportionally.

Resizing the Selection Field The Selection fields in the upper-left corner of the Workbook displays the group, item, or object that is currently selected in the Workbook. To change the width of the Selection field, put the cursor over the boundary on the right side of the field. When the cursor changes to a double-headed arrow, drag the boundary until the field is the width you want. When you increase or decrease the row size, the font is increased or Cross-Selection of Objects When you select takeoff geometry on the canvas, the corresponding object is selected both on the Takeoff palette and in the Workbook.

Similarly, when you select an object on the Takeoff palette or in the Workbook, the takeoff geometry is selected on the canvas. This 3-way visual cross-referencing of objectson the canvas, at the project level Takeoff palette , and at the sheet or project level Workbook can help you manage and validate takeoff data. These are the rules that govern the visual cross-referencing of objects: A selected objected is always highlighted in blue on the Takeoff palette and in the detail view of the Workbook.

When the item that contains a selected object is collapsed, the item is highlighted in gray, indicating that it contains the currently selected object. On the Takeoff palette, expand the item to see the selected object. In the summary view of the Workbook, double-click the item to see the selected object. When the takeoff group that contains a selected object is collapsed, the group is not highlighted. Expand the group to see the highlighted item; expand the item to see the selected object.

When an object is selected on the canvas, right-click it, and click Locate Object to quickly find the corresponding item and object on the Takeoff palette. QTO expands groups and subgroups on the Takeoff palette, as needed, to expose and highlight the selected object.

The object is also highlighted in the Workbook, but QTO does not expose it automatically as it does on the Takeoff palette. Setting Up Your Workspace This section describes various options for arranging the elements of the QTO user interface to suit your work preferences. Arranging Tools and Palettes You can move the toolbar and palettes to best suit your needs.

At any time, you can revert to the default workspace layout by clicking Window menu Move the toolbar: Drag the move handle on the docked toolbar, or the title bar on the floating toolbar, to the new location. Reset Window Layout. Move a palette: 1. On the palette title bar, click. Drag the title bar to the new location. When you drag the palette, docking controls display at the center of the canvas and at each edge to show where the palette can dock. Center docking controls 3. Drag the palette over one of the docking controls, and release the mouse button to dock the palette.

You can move columns on the Documents palette and in the Workbook. The column settings you specify persist from session to session. Hide or show a column: Right-click any column heading, and click the name of the column you want to hide or show. Change the width of a column: 1. Put the cursor over the boundary on the right side of the column heading.

The cursor changes to a double-headed arrow when the boundary is selected. Drag the boundary until the column is the width you want. Optimize the width of a column: Double-click a column boundary to change the column width to fit the contents.

Sort columns: By default, columns are sorted alphanumerically in ascending order. Click a column header to sort the values in the column alphanumerically in descending order. Click the column header again to sort it in ascending order. Change the column order: On the Documents palette and in the Workbook, move any column except the Description column by selecting it and dragging it to a new position on the palette.

Change the tab order in the Workbook: Move any tab by selecting it and dragging it to a new position in the Workbook. Organizing Your Project When you create a project, the documents you import are organized in folders on the Documents palette.

After creating the project, you can import additional documents. You can also move, rename, and delete documents and folders at any time during the project life cycle, but it is generally best to organize project documents before you start the takeoff process.

In the following exercises, you add documents to your project and organize them on the Documents palette. You also organize the Takeoff palette to set up the structure that will hold the takeoff data you create.

Importing Documents When you import DWF files, the sheets and models are placed in folders with names that are derived from the names of the DWF files. Each folder contains all sheets that were in the DWF file.

For image files, such as TIF files, each folder contains one sheet. Import documents: 1. Click Import. A folder is created for each imported file. Organizing Documents All project documents are organized in folders on the Documents palette.

You can add, rename, and delete folders, and you can move documents among folders to organize them for efficient use. In this exercise, you organize documents in folders based on view type, such as Floor Plans, Ceiling Plans, Sections, and Elevations. Delete a folder: 1. Right-click the folder, and click Delete. In the alert dialog, click Yes. You can delete documents individually, or you can delete them collectively by deleting a folder. Note that if there is takeoff on a sheet or model you delete, the takeoff is deleted from the project.

Rename folders: 1. Tip Alternatively, you can highlight the folder or document name, and click it to enter editing mode. Using the same method, move all of the 2D sheets to the appropriate folders, and delete the empty folders, as shown: Rename a document: 6. Organizing Takeoff Groups and Items When you created your project, you based it on the Getting Started catalog, which populated the Takeoff palette with takeoff groups and items.

In this exercise, you add, delete, and rename groups and items to customize the Takeoff palette for your project. After you customize the Takeoff palette, you export it as a catalog, which can be used in other projects. Delete unneeded takeoff groups: 1. On the Takeoff palette, click the lock icon in the column header next to Description, and click Yes when prompted to confirm the unlocking. This unlocks the catalog, allowing you to make changes. Select Specialties and click Tip: Delete.

As you saw in an earlier exercise when importing a catalog, you can exclude groups from your project catalog by clearing check boxes in the Select Items to Import dialog.

Takeoff groups, whether created through the catalog import process or with tools on the Takeoff palette, can be deleted at any time.

If you attempt to delete a group or item that contains takeoff data, QTO alerts you that your selection contains takeoff data and prompts you to confirm the deletion.

Rename a takeoff group: 3. Right-click Shell, and click Properties. For Remarks, enter Exterior Construction. Click OK. Add top-level takeoff groups: 7. On the Takeoff palette, click an empty area of the palette so that nothing is selected, and click Group. Tip: 8. A top-level group is added to root of the Takeoff palette. Using the same method, add these top-level takeoff groups: Building Site, Furnishings, and Plumbing.

Be sure to click an empty area of the palette before creating each group. Add subgroups: Select Electrical, and click New Group. The Lighting Fixtures subgroup is added within the Electrical group. Using multiple levels of groups helps you create the organizational structure you need for your project. Expand Exterior Exterior Walls.

The dormitory project requires a different type of exterior wall. Click the item name to enter editing mode. Enter Wall, Exterior, Brick on Mtl. After you modify a catalog, you might find it helpful to save it for use in another project. Export a takeoff catalog: Click File menu Export Catalog.

In the Save as Catalog dialog, to export the catalog to a non-default location, navigate to that location.

The hierarchical structure of the groups and item data displayed on the Takeoff palette is saved in the catalog. Modifying a standard catalog and saving it with a new name is an efficient way of creating catalogs to meet the requirements of your project or office standard. Use catalogs to ensure a consistent data structure across QTO projects within your organization.

Creating Takeoff Items QTO uses a takeoff item to represent a specific material or unit summarized in a materials list or catalog. Takeoff items can be simple, such as a door, or more complex, such as a wall assembly, which is made up of several component items.

In the following exercises, you create a takeoff item and an assembly on the Takeoff palette. The manner in which takeoff is calculated for each item is determined by the item type you specify when you create the item. The following item types are available: Linear. A linear takeoff item yields a linear measurement.

Examples of this item type include trim and beams. An area takeoff item yields an area calculation. Examples of this item type include flooring and carpet. A volume takeoff item yields a volume calculation. Examples of this item type include concrete slabs and rooms. Objects with this item type can be created only by automatic takeoff tools. A count takeoff item yields a total number.

Examples of this item type include doors, windows, and furnishings. This is the default type for a newly created takeoff item. Undefined items are not counted or measured when you use takeoff tools.

Sort columns: By default, columns are sorted alphanumerically in ascending order. Click a column header to sort the values in the column alphanumerically in descending order.

Click the column header again to sort it in ascending order. Change the column order: On the Documents palette and in the Workbook, move any column except the Description column by selecting it and dragging it to a new position on the palette.

Change the tab order in the Workbook: Move any tab by selecting it and dragging it to a new position in the Workbook. Organizing Your Project When you create a project, the documents you import are organized in folders on the Documents palette. After creating the project, you can import additional documents. You can also move, rename, and delete documents and folders at any time during the project life cycle, but it is generally best to organize project documents before you start the takeoff process.

In the following exercises, you add documents to your project and organize them on the Documents palette.

You also organize the Takeoff palette to set up the structure that will hold the takeoff data you create. Importing Documents When you import DWF files, the sheets and models are placed in folders with names that are derived from the names of the DWF files.

Each folder contains all sheets that were in the DWF file. For image files, such as TIF files, each folder contains one sheet. Import documents: Press and hold CTRL while selecting the following files: Click Import. A folder is created for each imported file.

Organizing Documents All project documents are organized in folders on the Documents palette.

You can add, rename, and delete folders, and you can move documents among folders to organize them for efficient use. In this exercise, you organize documents in folders based on view type, such as Floor Plans, Ceiling Plans, Sections, and Elevations. Delete a folder: Right-click the folder, and click Delete. In the alert dialog, click Yes. You can delete documents individually, or you can delete them collectively by deleting a folder.

Note that if there is takeoff on a sheet or model you delete, the takeoff is deleted from the project. Rename folders: Tip Alternatively, you can highlight the folder or document name, and click it to enter editing mode. Using the same method, rename the following folders:. Move documents to folders: Using the same method, move all of the 2D sheets to the appropriate folders, and delete the empty folders, as shown:. Rename a document: Organizing Takeoff Groups and Items When you created your project, you based it on the Getting Started catalog, which populated the Takeoff palette with takeoff groups and items.

In this exercise, you add, delete, and rename groups and items to customize the Takeoff palette for your project. After you customize the Takeoff palette, you export it as a catalog, which can be used in other projects.

Delete unneeded takeoff groups: On the Takeoff palette, click the lock icon in the column header next to Description, and click Yes when. This unlocks the catalog, allowing you to make changes. Select Specialties and click Tip: As you saw in an earlier exercise when importing a catalog, you can exclude groups from your project catalog by clearing check boxes in the Select Items to Import dialog.

Takeoff groups, whether created through the catalog import process or with tools on the Takeoff palette, can be deleted at any time. If you attempt to delete a group or item that contains takeoff data, QTO alerts you that your selection contains takeoff data and prompts you to confirm the deletion. Rename a takeoff group: Right-click Shell, and click Properties. For Remarks, enter Exterior Construction.

Click OK. Add top-level takeoff groups: On the Takeoff palette, click an empty area of the palette so that nothing is selected, and click Group. A top-level group is added to root of the Takeoff palette. Using the same method, add these top-level takeoff groups: Building Site, Furnishings, and Plumbing.

Be sure to click an empty area of the palette before creating each group. Add subgroups: Select Electrical, and click New Group. The Lighting Fixtures subgroup is added within the Electrical group. Using multiple levels of groups helps you create the organizational structure you need for your project. Using the same method, add these subgroups:. Rename an item: Expand Exterior Exterior Walls. The dormitory project requires a different type of exterior wall.

Click the item name to enter editing mode. Enter Wall, Exterior, Brick on Mtl. After you modify a catalog, you might find it helpful to save it for use in another project. Export a takeoff catalog: Click File menu Export Catalog.

In the Save as Catalog dialog, to export the catalog to a non-default location, navigate to that location. The hierarchical structure of the groups and item data displayed on the Takeoff palette is saved in the catalog. Modifying a standard catalog and saving it with a new name is an efficient way of creating catalogs to meet the requirements of your project or office standard.

Use catalogs to ensure a consistent data structure across QTO projects within your organization. Creating Takeoff Items QTO uses a takeoff item to represent a specific material or unit summarized in a materials list or catalog. Takeoff items can be simple, such as a door, or more complex, such as a wall assembly, which is made up of several component items. In the following exercises, you create a takeoff item and an assembly on the Takeoff palette.

The manner in which takeoff is calculated for each item is determined by the item type you specify when you create the item. The following item types are available: A linear takeoff item yields a linear measurement. Examples of this item type include trim and beams. An area takeoff item yields an area calculation.

Examples of this item type include flooring and carpet. A volume takeoff item yields a volume calculation. Examples of this item type include concrete slabs and rooms. Objects with this item type can be created only by automatic takeoff tools. A count takeoff item yields a total number. Examples of this item type include doors, windows, and furnishings. This is the default type for a newly created takeoff item.

Undefined items are not counted or measured when you use takeoff tools. Change the item type to create a valid takeoff item that can be counted or measured. Creating a Takeoff Item In this exercise, you create takeoff items for plumbing fixtures and carpet.

Item colors are assigned sequentially as you create items. If you have created items in QTO projects prior to beginning these exercises, the item colors in your sample project may differ from those shown in this guide. Create a plumbing fixture item: You can also right-click and click New Item, or you can click 2.

The new item is added to the Plumbing Fixtures subgroup. In the Type column for the item, select Count. Double-click the new item to open the Takeoff Item Properties dialog. On the General tab, for Height, enter , and for Unit, select mm. On the Cost Data tab: Under Cost Quantities, notice that the Quantity 1 value Count cannot be edited.

This is the primary quantity for the item, which you defined by specifying the item type. For Material Cost, enter , and accept the default multiplier, Qty 1 Count. Material Cost is the cost of raw materials. You can calculate material cost either on a per unit or lump sum basis.

By entering Qty 1 Count as the multiplier, you specify that the cost of the item is per unit. New item. New Item. For Labor Cost, enter , and accept the default multiplier, Qty 1 Count.

Labor Cost is the cost of installation. By entering Qty 1 Count as the multiplier, you specify that the cost of installing the item is per unit. Create a carpet item: The carpet item is added to the Floor Finishes subgroup. For Type, select Area. Double-click the new item. In the Takeoff Item Properties dialog, on the General tab: Under Visual Display, for Color, click the color value.

In the Color dialog, select a green shade, and click OK. For Hatch, click the hatch value. In the Hatch Patterns dialog, view the available hatch patterns, and then click the Default tab, select Clear, and click OK. Note You can also specify a value for Equipment Cost to account for the cost of downloadd or rented equipment needed for installation.

Save the Dormitory project. For Material Cost, enter 3. For Labor Cost, enter 1. Creating an Assembly Takeoff items that contain component items are called assemblies. For example, if an interior wall item is created as an assembly, you can expand the wall item in the Workbook and view the component items that make up the wall, such as gypsum wallboard, wood studs, and insulation.

In this exercise, you create a takeoff item for the interior wall assembly shown below. Before creating an assembly item, make sure all of the assembly components have been added to the Takeoff palette. In this case, the gypsum wallboard and R insulation items already exist in the Materials group.

However, the wood studs in the Materials group are 50 x mm, not 50 x mm as the assembly requires. In this exercise, you create the 50 x mm wood stud item by copying and modifying the 50 x mm item.

You then create the wall assembly item, select its components, and add formulas for quantity calculations. Create an item by copying a similar item: Select mm Wood Studs 50 x mm, right-click, and click Duplicate. Copy of mm Wood Studs 50 x mm is added to the Takeoff palette. Double-click Copy of mm Wood Studs 50 x mm.

For Type, select Count. On the General tab: For Height, enter , and for Unit, select mm. For Thickness, enter 50, and for Unit, select mm. For Material Cost, enter 2. For Labor Cost, enter 3. All components of the wall assembly are now available.

Create an interior wall assembly: On the Takeoff palette, under Interiors, select Partitions, and click The new item is added to the Partitions subgroup. For Type, select Linear. Under Dimension, for Height, enter , and for Unit, select mm. For Thickness, enter , and for Unit, select mm. Add Unit. In the Browse dialog, select the components by doing the following: Expand Materials, and expand the subgroups to display the component items.

While pressing CTRL, select the following: In the Takeoff Item Properties dialog, click Apply. The interior wall assembly is created. Next, you add formulas for the components, which will allow the software to calculate item quantities and costs. The costs you specify for the components of an assembly supersede any costs you specify for the assembly item itself. Enter formulas for components: For Gypsum Board, 16mm, click in the Quantity 1 column. In the Formula Editor: For Quantity Values, select Area.

The value is displayed in the fx field, and the formula is displayed below it. For a standard x mm sheet of gypsum wallboard 2. This is the unit of measure that the software will use when calculating the count formula.

Note Only components with a Count item type use this unit of measure. Components with Linear, Area, and Volume item types use the measurement units that are specified in the Takeoff Item Properties dialog for the component item. Using the same method, specify formulas for the other components: This is the area of a standard x mm batt of insulation, converted to square meters.

This calculation allows for a stud every. The wall assembly is now set up so that quantity and cost totals will be updated when you create takeoff for wall objects in project drawings.

Takeoff groups and items do not display in the Workbook until they contain at least one takeoff object. In a later exercise, you add takeoff objects to the wall assembly, and then view the quantity and cost totals in the Workbook. First, you learn about takeoff methods and how to set the sheet scale for image files in preparation for using the takeoff tools. The type of document you select on the Documents palette determines the tools that are available for automatic and manual takeoff sometimes called on-screen takeoff:.

These tools create takeoff data using the design data embedded in the DWF files by publishing applications. These tools are: Model Takeoff. This tool, which can be used only with 3D DWF files, extracts the object tree from the model and adds it to the Takeoff palette.

The items that are created by the Model Takeoff tool are placed in a takeoff group whose name is based on the model name. You create valid takeoff for these items by dragging them to a defined area root, group, or item on the Takeoff palette.

This tool, which can be used with 3D models and 2D sheets, creates takeoff data for multiple items based on search criteria you define. Using the tool, you select a piece of geometry on a sheet and specify search criteria based on the objects design data. The software finds all objects in the project that match the search criteria. The geometry and properties for the objects are loaded into the Takeoff palette item. Select an item on the Takeoff palette prior to starting a search takeoff to have the results added to that item and named based on the items family or style.

This tool, which can be used with 3D models and 2D sheets, lets you create a takeoff measurement with a single click on a piece of geometry. They measure drawing geometry to create takeoff data. Linear Takeoff. This group of tools lets you record linear measurements by tracing lines on a floor plan or, in the case of the Single-Click Linear Takeoff tool, by clicking on a line.

Area Takeoff. This group of tools lets you record area measurements by tracing geometry on a floor plan. Count Takeoff. This tool lets you tally and record occurrences of objects, such as windows and doors, that you want to quantify on a floor plan. Backout Takeoff. This group of tools lets you refine takeoff data by subtracting from previously recorded counts or measurements. That scale is reflected in the measurements that are calculated and displayed in QTO.

You cannot change the scale of a drawing when the scale is set by the authoring application. Without a sheet scale, only the Count Takeoff tool is available. You can select a predefined scale, if known, or set the precision manually by plotting points in a drawing. Selecting a Predefined Scale In this exercise, you select a predefined scale for an image file because the scale of the original drawing is known to be 1: In the Document Properties dialog, click the Units and Scale tab.

For Scale Style, select Engineering. For Drawing Units, select Millimeters. For Sheet Scale, select 1: Specifying Scale Manually When you do not know the scale of the original drawing, set the scale of the image file manually by plotting points in the drawing. Specifying the scale calibrates the manual takeoff tools to resolve distortions in scanned image files. In this exercise, you use a known object measurement to specify the scale for an image file.

On the canvas, zoom in to the south entry door. This command opens the Document Properties dialog directly on the Units and Scale tab. In the Document Properties dialog: Click Set scale by plotting points. In order to scale a drawing accurately, you select an object with a known dimension to use as the baseline segment. Because the south entry door is known to be millimeters wide, you enter the value, and then draw the segment that represents that value.

On the canvas, trace the width of the south entry door as the baseline segment by clicking to specify the start point and clicking again to specify the end point. QTO records the measured length of the segment and calculates the scale of the drawing.

If you change the length or unit of measure of the baseline segment, the scale calculation updates dynamically. In the Document Properties dialog, the calculated scale displays as the value for Custom Scale. Automatic takeoff tools use the design data from the publishing application to create takeoff, rather than measuring drawing geometry as manual takeoff tools do.

You can perform model takeoffs on multiple models in a project. If the project contains matching 2D sheets, these sheets are marked up and cross-referenced. When you perform a model takeoff, QTO extracts the object tree from the 3D model and places it in a group on the Takeoff palette. The first time you use the tool, all items in the group have an Undefined item type. When you define the item types, you create valid takeoff for those items and objects, and your selections are used to predictively assign item types during subsequent uses of the tool.

In previous exercises, you created the hierarchy for your takeoff project and created items with cost and dimension data. In this exercise, you perform a model takeoff, and then you define objects from the model to populate your takeoff structure with data.

Perform a model takeoff: On the toolbar, click Model Takeoff. Model to start the takeoff. Click the model on the canvas to start the takeoff.

You can also perform a model takeoff by clicking Takeoff menu immediately. When a dialog prompts you that the takeoff is complete, click Close. The object tree that populated the Model palette when you imported the 3D model is now added to the Takeoff palette. Define the model takeoff data: Put the cursor over the boundary on the right side of the palette. When the cursor changes to a double-headed arrow, drag the boundary until all of the dimension columns are visible. Objects created through model takeoffs and other automatic tools are quantified when their item type is defined and at least one dimension is mapped.

Pinning and resizing the Takeoff palette can help you work more efficiently as you define model takeoff results. The object is Undefined. Only defined objects are measured and counted in QTO. Next, you define the door object by dragging it to a defined item on the Takeoff palette. QTO generates quantities for model objects by extracting their embedded design data and mapping it to dimensions in the catalog.

As you work, notice that some dimensions are mapped automatically, based on item type. The item type defines the primary dimension of the item; for example, by default, Linear items are mapped to Length. Each dimension is also mapped to a default object property, which is the property that is measured during takeoff. Default object properties are specified on the Mapping tab. By default, linear objects are mapped to the Length property.

Therefore, if a linear object contains a Length property; the length of the object is measured and reported during takeoff. Some Linear objects, such as interior walls, have additional linear properties, such as Width and Unconnected Height. When additional properties are available for an object, they display in the dimension columns.

You can select a different property to change the property that is measured during takeoff. Some objects do not contain the default property. In this case, the primary dimension value is Undefined on the Takeoff palette and no measurement can be generated for the object. By specifying a property for the primary dimension, you can generate a takeoff measurement for the object.

If an object does not contain a mappable property, you must enter an override in the Workbook to create a measurement for the object. Later in this exercise, you select a property for Stair objects that do not contain the default Length property. Notice that when you put the cursor over the group and subgroup, they expand. Expand Door, Bifold-4 Panel, x mm. The door object inherits the Count item type from the bifold door item, and the values in the dimension columns remain Undefined.

Count objects do not require any dimensions to be mapped. The door object inherits the Count item type from the single-flush door item, creating a measurable takeoff object. Next, you define multiple takeoff objects. The door objects are now measurable takeoff objects. Continue defining the Undefined objects from the model takeoff data by moving objects to the appropriate defined items, using the following table as a guide: Examples Move the Undefined objects in this location: To the appropriate takeoff item in this group: Partition 1-hr.

They will be moved in the next exercise. Define a wall assembly object: The takeoff you defined for the model displays in the Workbook. In the Workbook, click the Interiors tab, and expand Partitions.

The object inherits the Linear item type, and the Length value is mapped automatically. The item quantity and costs are updated in the Workbook. Modify the Workbook display: Right-click in the column header area of the Workbook, and select Remarks. The Remarks column is now hidden.

Only the Description and Quantity 1 columns are displayed. Right-click in a blank area of the column header, and select Material Cost. The Material Cost column displays to the right of the Quantity 1 column. The Workbook displays the quantities and costs for the wall assembly and its component items in the summary view.

Walls Basic Wall Interior - mm Partition. Define the remaining wall assembly objects: On the Takeoff palette, select all of the remaining Interior - mm Partition 1-hr wall objects, and drag them to the wall assembly item. Notice that the item quantities and costs are updated in the summary view of the Workbook. View the detailed object data: Double-click the wall assembly item. The detail view of the Workbook displays. The item displays at the top of the view, and the detailed object data associated with the item is indented below it.

Scroll through the object data. Click Filter the takeoff data: On the Takeoff palette, click the Filter list, and select View Undefined. Back in the upper-left corner of the Workbook to return to the summary view. This filter limits the takeoff data to only undefined items and objects, so you can quickly locate the takeoff data that still needs to be defined. Note that all undefined data is in the model takeoff results, which you finish defining in this exercise.

Click the Filter list, and select View All. The default view of the Takeoff palette is restored. In the previous steps, you defined model takeoff data by dragging Undefined objects to defined items on the Takeoff palette. Next, you define the remaining model takeoff data by specifying item types and dragging the defined items to groups on the Takeoff palette. Finish defining takeoff data: Notice that the property in the Area column is Undefined.

In the Area column, select Surface Area. All available Area properties are listed as values. Any property you select will yield a takeoff measurement.

The item and its associated object are added to your project catalog and the Workbook. Continue defining the Undefined items from the model takeoff, using the following table as a guide. Be sure to select an item type for each item. For item types other than Count, be sure to select a property whenever the items primary dimension is Undefined. Note Additional dimensions are defined automatically when the default properties are present in the objects.

You need to define only one dimension to quantify an item, but you may define additional dimensions to generate secondary quantities. Examples Move this Undefined item: To this takeoff group: Topography Surface, select Model Takeoff. This is the default name given to an unnamed item when the embedded data is extracted from the.

List: Displays the file icon and sheet name.

Count Tip: To assign the same Type value to multiple items, press CTRL while selecting the items, and then select the Type value. These toilet objects will be created as manual takeoff in a later exercise. Verify that the primary dimension for each item has a defined property. If you did not define a Length property for the Stair item when you moved it into the catalog, select a property, such as Actual Riser Height.

Rename items with more descriptive names, as needed. For example, under Furniture, rename x x mm as Table-Night Stand x x mm, and rename x mm as Desk x mm. Click File menu Save. Notice that On the Documents palette, select Floor Plans.

On the canvas, notice that all of the objects you defined now display in their defined colors on the 2D sheet. In a real-world project, you would finish defining takeoff data from the model takeoff results by moving the remaining Plumbing Fixtures and Rooms objects into your project catalog.

In this guide, you quantify these objects using other takeoff tools to learn about the range of tools available in QTO. Next, you use another automatic takeoff tool to create takeoff objects for the rooms in your project.

Later, you use a manual tool to create takeoff objects for the remaining plumbing fixtures. Using the Search Takeoff Tool Using the Search Takeoff tool, you can quickly create takeoff for similar objects by using design data dimensions and text as search criteria. In this exercise, you use the Search Takeoff tool to find model objects with a Room property and create takeoff objects for them. Note Search Takeoff is run on the entire project. Select the takeoff geometry: Verify that Sheet: When you select a group or item on the Takeoff palette before starting the search takeoff, the takeoff objects are added to the selected group or item.

If no group or item is selected, the objects are added to the root of the Takeoff palette. On the canvas, move the cursor next to one of the walls inside Room 5 until the cursor changes from an arrow to a hand, and then click to select the room. Specify the search criteria: In the Search Takeoff dialog: For Name and Item Type, notice that the values cannot be modified.

These values are inherited from the Room item you selected on the Takeoff palette. For Destination, notice that the location is determined by the item you selected. If you browse to a different item, the Name and Item Type values are updated accordingly.

For Property, select Name in the Identity Data section. The selections you make under Property are used as search criteria. Click Search. The takeoff objects are added to the Takeoff palette and the Workbook. On the Takeoff palette, notice that the room objects inherit the Area item type from the Room item, and their primary dimension is mapped to the Area property automatically. Mapping this dimension allows QTO to quantify the objects.

In the Workbook, click the Building Areas tab, and expand Rooms. Double-click the Room item to view room object data. Because the Workbook is currently filtered to show data for the active sheet, only 16 of the room objects are shown. You can see the other 6 room objects by viewing the floor plan that contains the rooms. On the Documents palette, select Sheet: Alternatively, you can see all 22 room objects reported in the Workbook by switching from the Sheet filter to the Project filter.

Click Workbook palette menu Workbook Filter Project. By using the Search Takeoff tool to find model objects with a Room property, you have created takeoff for all of the living spaces. Using the same method, you can create takeoff for the bathrooms, conference room, lobby and corridor, mechanical rooms, and stairwells in your project.

By default, the takeoff data you create with this tool is grouped according to the family or style defined in the objects properties. However, on the Contextual Tools palette, you have the option of grouping the takeoff data by selection instead. The grouping option you select becomes the default setting.

When you group by selection, the takeoff is added to the group or item that is selected on the Takeoff palette. If you add the takeoff to an item, the object s display below the item, using the name from the model properties. If you add the takeoff to a group, the object s are added to an Auto item within the group. In this exercise, you create takeoff objects for lighted emergency exit signs in the stairwells.

Modify the sheet display: Click View menu Fit to Window. Zoom Rectangle , and zoom in to the area around one of the stairwells. Create automatic takeoff objects: On the Takeoff palette, select Electrical. On the toolbar, click Single-Click Auto Takeoff.

When you group by selection, the takeoff objects you create are added to the takeoff group or item that is selected on the Takeoff palette. On the canvas, click the room tags in all 4 stairwells on the Entry Level and Upper Level 1 floor plan.

Drag the blue rectangle on the Navigator palette to navigate the floor plan. The takeoff objects are added to the Takeoff palette. Using the same method, create takeoff objects for the room tags in the stairwells on Upper Level 2.

Verify that the Auto item is selected on the Takeoff palette before you click the room tags. On the Takeoff palette, double-click the Auto item. In the Takeoff Item Properties dialog: On the Cost Data tab, for Material Cost, enter 29, and accept the default multiplier. For Labor Cost, enter 18, and accept the default multiplier. On the Takeoff palette, click the Filter list, and select View Defined.

This filter limits the takeoff data to only defined items and objects and the takeoff groups that contain them. Now that you have defined the model takeoff data and added defined takeoff data for rooms and emergency exit signs, you no longer need to view Undefined items and objects.

Manual takeoff tools count objects or measure drawing geometry, rather than using published design data as automatic takeoff tools do. This takeoff method is sometimes called on-screen takeoff.

In the following exercises, you create takeoff for toilets on all levels of the dormitory and for carpet in the corridor on the entry level. Use this tool to create takeoff for objects, such as windows and doors that have a Count Item type. In this exercise, you use the Count Takeoff tool to count toilets on a floor plan.

Quantity Take Off Manual

Click View menu Click Fit to Window. Select objects to create takeoff: On the Contextual Tools palette, for Symbol Size, select 4. Select the toilet in Room 10, next to the North Stair. Each time you select a toilet, a count symbol is placed on the sheet, and an object is recorded both on the Takeoff palette and in the Workbook. Select the 3 remaining mm toilets on Sheet: Do not select the toilet in Room It has a seat height of mm.

Height on the Takeoff palette before you select the toilets on the floor plan. All 6 toilet objects are recorded both on the Takeoff palette and in the Workbook. Using the same method, select the 2 toilets on Upper Level 2. Be sure to select Toilet - mm Seat. In the Workbook, click the Plumbing tab, and expand Plumbing Fixtures. Double-click Toilet - mm Seat Height to view the object data.

When you performed the search takeoff exercise previously, you set the Workbook filter to Project view. If you retained this filter, all of the toilet objects for the project now display in the Workbook. If you changed the filter back to Sheet view, the Workbook shows data only for the active sheet; therefore, only 2 of the objects are shown.

If this is the case, change the Workbook filter to Project view to view all 6 objects. On the Takeoff palette, right-click any toilet object, click Views, and click the sheet listed on the flyout menu. QTO zooms in to the selected object on the associated view drawing. On the Takeoff palette, click the selected object to enter editing mode.

In order to rename the objects by location, open the Navigator palette to see where the selected object is on the sheet. Using the same method, rename the remaining objects, as shown. Using an Area Takeoff Tool In this exercise, you use a manual takeoff tool to yield an area measurement for carpet. On the Documents palette, under Floor Plans, select Sheet: Click Level. Create a takeoff object with a polyline tool: On the Takeoff palette, select Interiors On the toolbar, click first line segment.

Continue to specify points to trace the corridor walls and create a closed polygon, as shown. To close the polyline area, click near the start point or right-click. Pan the drawing until the geometry you need is in view. Floor Finishes Floor, Carpet. Pan , and move the sheet to show the south portion of the lobby and corridor on the Entry.

On the canvas, begin to trace the corridor walls by clicking to specify the start point and end point of your. Create a takeoff object with a rectangle tool: Click Pan , and pan to the left to display the south end of Upper Level 1.

In Room 14, click one corner to specify the start point of the rectangle, move the cursor diagonally across the room, and click the opposite corner to specify the end point. In the Workbook, double-click Floor, Carpet to view object data. Next, you use an area backout tool to subtract from this area measurement. Using a Backout Takeoff Tool Use the backout tools in QTO to refine takeoff data by subtracting from a previously calculated measurement or count.

In this exercise, you use the Polyline Backout Takeoff tool to remove a portion of the carpet area measurement to account for the void created by the curved wall. On the canvas, zoom in to the curved wall in Room On the toolbar, click Polyline Backout Takeoff. For the first point of the arc, specify the intersection of the curved wall and the wall on the left.

For the second point, specify the midpoint of the curved wall, as shown. For the last point of the arc, specify the intersection of the curved wall and the wall on the right. The area measurement displayed on the canvas is updated as well. Click Back in the upper-left corner of the Workbook to return to the summary view. Add Markup to a Sheet In this exercise, you use markup tools to add a callout and text to a sheet. Add a callout to the curved wall: On the Toolbar, click Place the callout: Specify a point on the right side of the curved wall as the start point.

Move the cursor up and to the right to specify the second point. In the text box, enter Is wall continuous from floor to ceiling? Specify a point near the top of the sheet to place the stamp. Add a legend: On the Documents palette, for Sheet: Alternatively, you can click Document menu Legend to add a legend to the selected sheet. The legend is composed of a color block, an item label, and quantity information, showing the amount of the item that is used on the sheet.

By default, legends show the primary quantity Quantity 1 and associated unit for each item. On the toolbar, click , and select the legend on the canvas. With the legend selected, you can modify the legend settings on the Contextual Tools palette, and you can reposition the legend as needed.

Viewing and Validating Takeoff Data After you create takeoff data using automatic or manual takeoff tools, it is important to review and validate the data to ensure the quality of the information. When you create takeoff data in QTO, takeoff markup is displayed on the canvas, each measurement is recorded as an object on the Takeoff palette, and quantity and cost data is aggregated in the Workbook.

All of this data is linked in a 3-way cross-reference. Therefore, when you select takeoff geometry on the canvas, the corresponding object is selected both on the Takeoff palette and in the Workbook. This 3-way visual cross-referencing of objectson the canvas, at the project level Takeoff palette , and at the sheet or project level Workbook is designed to help you validate takeoff data. Only items that have a measurable value display in the Workbook. Items are measurable when they have both a defined Type value either Linear, Area, Volume, or Count and a defined property for at least one dimension.

For example, when you defined model takeoff results in an earlier exercise, you needed to specify a Length property for the Stair item when you moved it into the catalog.

If you did not do this, the Stair item would not display in the Workbook. Cross-referencing items on the Takeoff palette with those in the Workbook can help you validate your data. In this exercise, you validate takeoff data using the following methods: Verify that when you select an object on the Takeoff palette, the same object is selected in the Workbook and on the canvas.

Right-click the object on the Takeoff palette, click Views, and click a view drawing on the list that displays. QTO zooms in to that object on the canvas. Right-click the object on the canvas, and click Locate Object.

The corresponding object is selected on the Takeoff palette. Use the Search feature to locate all occurrences of a word or phrase, and select a specific search result to view the related takeoff data. Validate takeoff data: In the summary view of the Workbook, click the Exterior tab, and expand Exterior Windows.

Double-click Window, Andersen C35 to view object data.

On the Takeoff palette, expand Exterior select Andersen C35 []. Verify that the window is selected on the canvas and in the Workbook. Tip Move any column except the Description column by selecting the column header and dragging it to a new position on the palette.Ejam Cool.

Material reports can include quantity and cost information, object properties and dimensions, and sheet location for each item and object in your project. For Labor Cost, enter , and accept the default multiplier, Qty 1 Count. On the General tab of the Reports dialog: From the summary view, double-click an item to display the detailed object data associated with it.

Sort columns: General and site contractors are often searching for the ideal way to calculate cut and fill quantities from grading plans. It contains one additional tab: the Summary tab, which is a compilation of all takeoff information for all categories.

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